Voxes approved by the

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  • By mike for the
    Saturday, March 29, 2014 Login to agree. Login to disagree.
    Mozilla's choice for CEO is a sad step backward.

    Mozilla's choice for CEO is a sad step backward. Mozilla has always embraced a spirit of social progress. Given the increasing evidence of elitism and monoculturalism in the tech industry, this move seems shockingly dismissive and ignorant. Tech companies need to do all they can to increase diversity and tolerance in the industry. And as a public face and vision-setter, each tech CEO plays a pivotal role in that.

  • By bboyatwork for the
    Friday, February 7, 2014 Login to agree. Login to disagree.
    We >hackers are very interested in what bitcoin,

    We >hackers are very interested in what bitcoin, as a platform, has to offer for the future of our e-conomy. The interview from Vice (linked) is a great introduction to what the current state of the crypto-currency is and what types of disruptions it can cause.

  • By mike for the
    Sunday, February 2, 2014 Login to agree. Login to disagree.
    Huge tech companies are unimaginative and clueless

    Huge tech companies are unimaginative and clueless when it comes to being good community citizens. One would expect, at the least, their marketing departments to recognize the importance of maintaining a positive image for the neighborhoods wherein their employees reside. But then again, Apple has proven short-sighted in their brand development, on the one hand assuming a creative, individualistic brand while on the other aggressively sheltering profits from taxes and putting punishing demands on factory workers. It seems these companies will continue to ignore the dignity of outside individuals. It's up to them to be unignorable. But it would be great if these companies seized this critical moment, acknowledged that their operations displace people, and earnestly forged respectful problem-solving relationship with them.

  • By mike for the
    Wednesday, January 29, 2014 Login to agree. Login to disagree.

    Government spies on people through mobile apps? There's blame to go around but the buck stops at the app developers. They might point the finger at the third-party ad providers (who were directly responsible for leaking the data) but they themselves were the ones to integrate with those shoddy/shady ad tech companies.

  • By mike for the
    Thursday, January 2, 2014 Login to agree. Login to disagree.
    Design is the result of creativity motivated by empathy for the pain of others. 

Design is good. We like design.

    Design is the result of creativity motivated by empathy for the pain of others. Design is good. We like design.

  • By mike for the
    Tuesday, September 10, 2013 Login to agree. Login to disagree.

    Fixing sexism in tech requires a personal approach. We’ve seen an increased focus and willingness to acknowledge and address this issue throughout the tech community, but many still deny that it exists. Much has been said of the inertia of male privilege and the meritocratic ideals of the tech industry, both of which are invariably characterized sociologically, as some metaphysical Force that operates on a level separate of the individual. At the same time, the sociological/systemic problem continues to be defined as the aggregate of interpersonal—not societal—failures (an authority figure looking the other way toward degrading behavior, men telling insensitive/sexist jokes, etc). This interpersonal dimension needs to be consciously discussed, lest this issue stagnate like many others in greater society. An article hit Hacker News today about the sexist bullying experienced by one female high school student in her computer science class. This obviously spills out of the tech field into high school culture, but generated a lot of discussion on Hacker News regardless. One comment called for men to simply accept that women have subjectively different experiences than they do. We agree, but the questions remain: why haven’t men already done this, and how do we progress from there? For many men having difficulty in comprehending/accepting that women experience the industry so differently than they do, they either A) over-generalize from an exceptional interaction, or B) follow those that have over-generalized. For “A”, they rely on confirmation bias to cement their impression of the female experience based on a few choice interactions, in order to create an intellectually convenient worldview. For example, confirmation bias can allow a random chat with a well-adjusted, confident woman who appears impervious to tech sexism to dispel for many years any notion in that man’s mind that sexism exists in the industry. Thereafter, contradictory signals can themselves be dismissed as the exceptions, and because of cognitive dissonance, can even sere to reinforce the misconceptions. (It should be noted that even though a woman might appear impervious, she actually may not be anyway.) For “B”, men with no relevant direct interactions with women (not uncommon given their low numbers) may confirm their biases by following the lead of the people with whom they associate, who are by definition men. So any confirmation bias of those men then spreads to them. In considering such interpersonal breakdowns, what is not often recognized is that individual women have unique experiences. They are affected to varying degrees and in various ways by prejudism and ostracization. Males in our field, rather than tip-toe around or ignore the issue with a female colleague—allowing the assumption of the most intellectually convenient possibility—would best recognize their potential to be participants in a toxic environmentalists by earnestly sensing/inquiring the nature of her individual past experience. (You may also share your own relevant experiences, if any.) Such a dialogue can help establish a common foundation and framework for maximizing the team and progressing the industry. With a shift of focus to the direct, open, and individual treatment of interpersonal relationships (and moving away from the macroscopic one-experience-fits-all mentality, which lacks common sense and is susceptible to confirmation bias), we in the tech industry can continue to evolve ourselves toward one that is fair, supportive and welcoming to all.

  • By mike for the
    Thursday, August 8, 2013 Login to agree. Login to disagree.
    All that's left to learn about the new iPhone is the MSRP. And unless it's markedly low, we (and Jobs' ghost) will be pretty disappointed.

    All that's left to learn about the new iPhone is the MSRP. And unless it's markedly low, we (and Jobs' ghost) will be pretty disappointed.

  • By mike for the
    Monday, August 5, 2013 Login to agree. Login to disagree.
    Related image

    UX expert Josh Seiden recently posted his affirmative thoughts about the question "Should designers code?" If you’re “web-designing” solely as an artistic, self-directed endeavor, then “no” (but then we might prefer the term web art as opposed to web design). If you’re web-designing as part of anything larger, and you want to respect the development process and environmentalists, then “as much as possible, yes.” http://joshuaseiden.com/blog/2013/08/designers-...

  • By mike for the
    Thursday, March 8, 2012 Login to agree. Login to disagree.

    Talk about cheap commodity hardware! $35 700MHz Arm processor with 256MB memory. We'd love to build a Hadoop cluster out of a ton of those bad boys! http://www.alliedelec.com/raspberrypi/?gclid=CNrEuPbx164CFUZN4Aod-WA3cA